Okeanos – Dance, Art, and Science in San Francisco

The performance company “Capacitor” will be presenting ocean-themed “Okeanos” from April 12 through April 15 at Fort Mason’s Herbst Theater in San Francisco. From their words: “Okeanos is an immersive dance/circus/video experience that will inspire and educate audiences about the ocean, catalyze interest in art/science collaborations, and help to raise funds and awareness for marine […]

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Noise impacts on fish and invertebrates workshop

I spent last week in San Diego attending a workshop sponsored by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) on the impacts of human generated noise on marine fish and invertebrates. Having watched the field of ocean noise impacts roll slowly forward in fits and starts for 20 years, this workshop is really a breath […]

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Tracking walrus’ movement using only one ear

A recent paper was published by marine research firm JASCO on localizing walruses using a single hydrophone. The technique they have refined is detailed in the article and involves assessing “multipath signals” – echoes from the sea surface and seafloor – along with the direct signal to track the movements of walruses in the Arctic. […]

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Marine Scientists express themselves through CNN

An article appeared today in “CNN Opinion” by Chris Clark and Brandon Southall focused on the impacts of noise on marine life. It is an informative read and also highlights two important trends in the field. First, it points to a trend in impact awareness and research from incident-specific catastrophic impacts (such as sonar induced […]

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BBC Focus on Sounds of the Sea

Yesterday BBC News put out a feature article on ocean acoustics. I suspect that this is really making the rounds because many folks have brought it to our attention. For good reason too, as it includes some great embedded sounds, references to other useful resources, and a couple of conversations with folks in the field, […]

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National Ocean Policy released today for public review!

Today the National Ocean Council released their Draft Implementation Plan for a National Ocean Policy. This is fabulous news because the US has never had a comprehensive ocean management plan, we have just been tangled in a web of agencies each “managing” their own areas of concern – regional fisheries councils, Department of Transportation, Minerals […]

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Some good news in improving technologies!

Perhaps one of the more salient benefits of our work on ocean noise pollution is that unlike solid and chemical pollution, when the noise goes away, it is gone. This gives us reasons for optimism, particularly as we see efforts to improve technologies and practices by a broadening base of ocean stakeholders. The first inkling […]

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What the Ocean Provides

In the current issue of Orion Magazine there is an article about animal intelligence and the octopus that is worth a read. It is pretty much out in the field of common knowledge that these animals are remarkably intelligent. Most folks have heard one tale or another about an octopus sneaking out of their aquarium […]

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Throwing Precaution to the Wind – and the Waves

A recent IBM press release on an ocean noise monitoring project caught the attention of Forbes and other press this week because of a bit of an ironic twist: Our lack of precaution in developing earlier energy technologies – fossil fuel and nuclear, has sensitized us to potential problems in advancing new sustainable technologies like […]

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The Acoustic Ecology of Geophysical Surveys

OCR advisory board member and acoustic ecologist Jim Cummings sent us a New York Times article about life aboard geophysical research vessel (RV) Marcus G. Langseth wherein marine geologist Bernard Coakley writes about the acoustic environment aboard the vessel after winding down a survey operation. He writes that while a lot of the compressors, airguns, […]

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